Normandy Landing or D-Day – photos on color of the Normandy operation in 1944

Normandy Landing or D-Day – photos on color of the Normandy operation in 1944

The Allied landing in Normandy began on June 6, 1944, became the largest landing operation of the World War II and military history in general, and marked the opening of the Second Front. The Norman operation ended at the end of August with the liberation of Paris and the advance of the allied army to the French-German border. However, this decisive success will happen only three months later, but in the meantime, D-Day has come and the combined troops of the American, British, Canadian and other allied forces across the English Channel rushed to the Norman beaches, codenamed Utah, Gold, Juneau, Sword and Omaha where the fiercest battles broke out.

Color photos of Landing in Normandy

Day D of the Normandy operation on June 6, 1945 – then the following photos of the landing in Normandy were taken, which will surely be remembered by movie lovers (“Saving Private Ryan”) and gamers (Call of Duty 2). The truth is that the plot of the legendary movie and cult game is based on the events that took place on Omaha Beach, where due to fog and bad weather, the aircraft and artillery of the Allies were unable to suppress the Wehrmacht firing points (MG42/MG34).

Therefore, the landing was met with fierce fire from the German army and lost 1,700 killed and 3,000 wounded. On the remaining coastal bridgeheads, the Allies lost in total fewer soldiers than on Omaha Beach. On D-Day, 156,000 troops from the Allies took part in the initial phase of the operation, with new reinforcements added daily, bringing the total number of troops transferred to 2,876,000. About 230,000 soldiers remained on French soil.

The original black-and-white photographs of the Normandy landings were brought to life by color thanks to the participation of Royston Leonard, a specialist in such procedures.

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Surprising fact about Rommel

In fact, the weather forecast was so disappointing that the commander of German forces in Northern France, Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, was absolutely sure that there would be no landing. So he went home to give his wife a pair of new shoes as a gift for her 50th birthday. Rommel was in Germany when it became known of the Allied landing.

In the photo below, Field Marshal of the German Army Erwin Rommel inspects the coastal defenses of Normandy, 1944. In the foreground is a Wehrmacht soldier with a MG42 machine gun.

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

Color photograph of the D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944. Colored by Royston Leonard

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