The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. (8 Photo in Color)

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. (8 Photo in Color)

Battle of France. German troops in Dunkirk (1940) immediately after the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force. These photo in color were taken on June 4, 1940 by an officer of the 52nd machine gun battalion of the Wehrmacht, Hermann Weper. These photos capture the initial stage of WW2. The beginning of the history of the great war.

Battle of Dunkirk

These color photos show the aftermath of the Battle of Dunkirk (Battle of France) – the battle of WW2  between the Allied forces and Germany, which took place on May 26 – June 4, 1940 during the French campaign of the Wehrmacht.

Winston Churchill, in his famous speech “We Will Fight on the Beaches” in 1940, called the events in Dunkirk “a miraculous deliverance” , a good fortune for the allies. Churchill’s accolades were intended for a rescue operation in which 338,226 French and British soldiers were evacuated from the beach and harbor of Dunkirk, France.

Initially, it was assumed that the German troops occupying France would reach the coast where the military was stationed within two days.

In this case, it would be possible to ensure the safety of only 43 thousand soldiers. Nevertheless, thanks to the confusion of the Germans and the courageous actions of the members of the Coalition, the British and military soldiers were saved. The French-German border was almost entirely fortified by the so-called “Maginot Line”, but its northern section was protected only by the Ardennes forest. The Allies assumed that it was too thick and did not require serious protection, but the German troops managed to pave a road through the thicket.

As a result, the Germans actually ended up in the rear of the Allies, forcing them to move into Belgium, where they faced even more enemy soldiers. The only option was to enter the coastal city of Dunkirk, from where the military could be evacuated to England.

Why did the military end up on the beach?

In response to the German invasion of Poland in 1939, Britain sent troops to battle of France. After the Wehrmacht advanced into Belgium and the Netherlands in May 1940, the Allies made an almost fatal mistake.

German troops in Dunkirk. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

German officers talk to French prisoner officers

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

The Wehrmacht in Dunkirk. June 1940. Photo by Hermann Weper. Photo in color

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