We are digging at the crash site of the Luftwaffe. (Ju-88)

We are digging at the crash site of the Luftwaffe. (Ju-88)

Hello, in this article you will read about how we conducted excavations at the crash site of the World War II German aircraft Junkers-88. All events take place on the ground of the Leningrad front.

We learned about the crash site of the Luftwaffe plane from local residents who have been finding aluminum parts from the plane for many years in a row. We arrived a day earlier to set up camp. The next morning, our team began excavations. We supposedly discovered a crash site (a huge pit around which were the remains of the aircraft). The ground was swampy, so we had to pump out water. While the water pump was doing its job, we managed to collect a large number of aluminum parts from the aircraft. According to our assumptions, these are details from the German Junkers-88 bomber.

We examine the area for the presence of aircraft parts.

We examine the area for the presence of aircraft parts. Photo by @swamp_war.

aircraft

A large number of aircraft parts lay on the surface. Photo by @swamp_war.

Using my metal detector, I was able to detect an aluminum part that was coated with paint. The coloring was characteristic of the Luftwaffe aircraft. Having finished pumping water out of the pit, I picked up a shovel and began to dig up the war relics.

German aviation

Detail of the body of the aircraft. The color is characteristic of German aviation during the Second World War. Photo by @swamp_war.

One of my first finds was an airplane blade, which was bent from hitting the ground. On several details were nameplates. Thanks to these nameplates, we have residually confirmed our guesses – it was the Junkers-88 bomber.

aircraft

A huge number of aircraft parts indicated that we were on the right track. Photo by @swamp_war.

Airplane blade.

Airplane blade. Photo by @swamp_war.

The Junkers Ju 88 was a German World War II Luftwaffe twin-engined multirole combat aircraft. Junkers Aircraft and Motor Works (JFM) designed the plane in the mid-1930s as a so-called Schnellbomber (“fast bomber”) that would be too fast for fighters of its era to intercept. It suffered from technical problems during its development and early operational periods but became one of the most versatile combat aircraft of the war. Like a number of other Luftwaffe bombers, it served as a bomber, dive bomber, night fighter, torpedo bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, heavy fighter and at the end of the war, as a flying bomb.

Despite a protracted development, it became one of the Luftwaffe’s most important aircraft. The assembly line ran constantly from 1936 to 1945 and more than 15,000 Ju 88s were built in dozens of variants, more than any other twin-engine German aircraft of the period. Throughout production the basic structure of the aircraft remained unchanged.

Junkers-88

Junkers-88.

Digging all day, we found a huge number of fragments of the aircraft. The junkers’ crew most likely catapulted, since we did not find any bone remains. Unfortunately, we could not find anything interesting except for the parts with nameplates. However, soon we will go to another crash site of the German Henkel-111 aircraft.
You can see more details about the Junkers-88 excavations in the video on our YouTube channel. I will leave the video at the bottom of the article.

Read: USA airplane Lockheed P-38 Lightning lost in 1938 was found in Greenland

Junkers-88.

The nameplate shows the model of the aircraft – Junkers-88. Photo by @swamp_war.

Detail of a German bomber with a nameplate.

Detail of a German bomber with a nameplate. Photo by @swamp_war.

Detail of a German bomber with a nameplate.

Detail of a German bomber with a nameplate. Photo by @swamp_war.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft. Photo by @swamp_war.

Volkswagen

The early Volkswagen logo of 1933 in the form of a stylized swastika. Photo by @swamp_war.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft. Photo by @swamp_war.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft.

Details from the Junkers-88 aircraft. Photo by @swamp_war.

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