Wound Badge WW1 (Verwundetenabzeichen)

Wound Badge WW1 (Verwundetenabzeichen)

History of award Wound Badge WW1

Specs: The German Empire (1871-1918).Original German name Verwundetenabzeichen. Breastplate “For the wound” 3 degrees (“black wound”). Sign of William 2 (years of reign; 1888-1918 gg.) March 3, 1918.

German Imperial Armed Forces and German Imperial Armed Forces (German Imperial Army); 1914-1918 (one to two light wounds in total).

Photo of a German veteran with a wound sign asking for alms on the streets of Berlin (Germany, Weimar Republic, 1923).

Photo of a German veteran with a wound sign asking for alms on the streets of Berlin (Germany, Weimar Republic, 1923).

Wound Badge Description

Front view of the badge.

Front view of the badge. Photo by Apolon

In addition to the badge for an injury of the 3rd degree (“black wound”), the silver badge for 2nd-degree injuries (persons who received three or four light injuries or one moderate injury), and the gold badge for 1st-degree injuries (persons who received five or more minor injuries or one serious wound).  The gold badge could be handed posthumously to the family of a soldier who died from those wounds.

Reverse side of the badge.

Reverse side of the badge. Photo by Apolon

The medal came in slotted and non-slotted design. Miniature versions of the awards were also awarded.

The version for the Imperial Naval Forces of Germany (original name in German; Kaiserliche Marine) was for a 3rd-degree injury. Its insignia showed differences in the image of the anchor, crossed swords and anchor chain from the army award.

Enlarged photo of the award.

Enlarged photo of the award. Photo by Apolon

Material and manufacturing technique: brass, stamp, black paint, soldering.

Total sign size: 43 x 36 mm.

Description of the award:

oval, monolithic structure, with a locking groove pad, a vertical fastening needle and a clip in the form of a “catching hook”.

Obverse: image of helmet M 16 (“Stahlhelm”; “Steel helmet”), against the background of crossed medieval swords with points pointed upward, framed by a laurel wreath of heroes-winners.

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