Xmas digs on World War battlefield

During this winter vacation, we decided to dig up another German dugout. We chose a large dugout – 6 X 3 meters. Upon arrival at the planned place, the first thing we did was set up our camp. Having set up the camp, we had a hearty lunch (we needed a good supply of energy).

Camping

I advise everyone at least once in their life to  stay in the forest overnight. This is an indescribable feeling. Photo by @swamp_war

camp

Food cooked on a campfire is one hundred times tastier than food cooked on a stove. Photo by @swamp_war

Then we could get to work. The first thing you need is to pump out water from the dugout. For this we had a pump. Having pumped out water, we took up shovels. The first find was a German folding shovel. The wood handle was rottened, but the shovel itself was in good condition.

showel

German folding shovel. Usually they rust very much. But this one is well preserved. Photo by @swamp_war

The next find was a German high bowler (high bowlers were used during the First World War). Most likely, its owner took part not only in the Second World War, but also in the first. Next to the bowler was a German fork-spoon.

bowler

The bowler hat was all charred. The owner actively used it for heating food. Photo by @swamp_war

Digging out another section of the dugout, I saw a piece of leather strap sticking out of the ground. Having dug it from all sides, I managed to gently get it out of the strong embrace of moist soil. This belt turned out to be a German Y – swordbelt. The skin was in excellent condition. If re-fix the belt with new threads, it can be given a second life.

German Y - swordbelt

German Y – swordbelt. Photo by @swamp_war

The next find was a German gas mask. Behind it was a German smoking pipe.

gasmask

German gas mask and a wooden smoking pipe. Also in the photo there are two cases from lighting patrones. Photo by @swamp_war

Also we dug out an interesting German sandwich maker, which was in excellent condition, and fortunately both parts were found. Typically, sandwich makers quickly oxidize and rot.
At the bottom of the dugout we found a German box from M-24 grenades. There was a stove on this box. To our surprise, its colors did not faded, and the box looked almost like new.

Read: Dangerous battlefield finds

I won’t write anything about the remaining finds, since we no longer found anything interesting. You can see these finds in the following photos:

Two parts of the sandwich maker are highlighted in the photo. You can also see the rest of the finds that we find in almost every German dugout.

Two parts of the sandwich maker are highlighted in the photo. You can also see the rest of the finds that we find in almost every German dugout. Photo by @swamp_war

German grenade M-24 with a preserved wooden handle.

German grenade M-24 with a preserved wooden handle. Photo by @swamp_war

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